Horse Chestnut

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 Horse chestnut trees are native to the Balkan Peninsula (for example, Greece and Bulgaria), but grow throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Although horse chestnut is sometimes called buckeye, it should not be confused with the Ohio or California buckeye trees, which are related but not the same species.

Common Names—horse chestnut, buckeye, Spanish chestnut

Latin NamesAesculus hippocastanum



Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Hoodia is a flowering, cactus-like plant native to the Kalahari Desert in southern Africa. Its harvest is protected by conservation laws.

Common Names—hoodia, Kalahari cactus, Xhoba

Latin NamesHoodia gordonii


Aloe Vera

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera

Aloe vera’s use can be traced back 6,000 years to early Egypt, where the plant was depicted on stone carvings. Known as the "plant of immortality," aloe was presented as a burial gift to deceased pharaohs.


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.


 astragalus—common names, uses, potential side effects, and resources for more information. Native to China, astragalus has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine. In the United States, the herb gained popularity in the 1980s. There are actually over 2,000 species of astragalus; 

The root of the astragalus plant is typically used in soups, teas, extracts, or capsules. Astragalus is generally used with other herbs, such as ginseng, angelica, and licorice.

Bitter Orange

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Bitter Orange

The bitter orange tree is native to eastern Africa and tropical Asia. Today, it is grown throughout the Mediterranean region and elsewhere, including California and Florida. Bitter orange oil is used in foods, cosmetics, and aromatherapy products. Bitter orange oil from the tree’s leaves is called petitgrain, and oil from the flowers is called neroli.

Common Names—bitter orange, Seville orange, sour orange, Zhi shi

Latin Name—Citrus aurantium

What Bitter Orange Is Used For
Bitter orange has been used in traditional Chinese medicine and by indigenous people of the Amazon rainforest for nausea, indigestion, and constipation.
Current uses of bitter orange are for heartburn, loss of appetite, nasal congestion, and weight loss. It is also applied to the skin for fungal infections such as ringworm and athlete's foot.

How Bitter Orange Is Used
The dried fruit and peel (and sometimes flowers and leaves) are taken by mouth in extracts, tablets, and capsules. Bitter orange oil can be applied to the skin.

What the Science Says
There is not enough scientific evidence to support the use of bitter orange for health purposes.
Many herbal weight-loss products now use concentrated extracts of bitter orange peel in place of ephedra. However, bitter orange contains the chemical synephrine, which is similar to the main chemical in ephedra. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned ephedra because it raises blood pressure and is linked to heart attacks and strokes; it is unclear whether bitter orange has similar effects. There is currently little evidence that bitter orange is safer to use than ephedra.
Side Effects and Cautions

Because bitter orange contains chemicals that may speed up the heart rate and raise blood pressure, it may not be safe to use as a dietary supplement. There have been reports of fainting, heart attack, and stroke in healthy people after taking bitter orange supplements alone or combined with caffeine. People should avoid taking bitter orange supplements if they have a heart condition or high blood pressure, or if they are taking medications (such as MAO inhibitors), caffeine, or other herbs/supplements that speed up the heart rate.
Due to lack of safety evidence, pregnant women or nursing mothers should avoid products that contain bitter orange.
Bitter orange oil used on the skin may increase the risk of sunburn, particularly in light-skinned people. 

Black Cohosh

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Black Cohosh

 Black cohosh, a member of the buttercup family, is a plant native to North America. It was used in Native American medicine and was a home remedy in 19th-century America

Common Names—black cohosh, black snakeroot, macrotys, bugbane, bugwort, rattleroot, rattleweed

Latin Names—Actaea racemosa, Cimicifuga racemosa


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Dandelion greens are edible and are a rich source of vitamin A. Dandelion has been used in many traditional medical systems, including Native American and traditional Arabic medicine.

Common Names—dandelion, lion's tooth, blowball

Latin Name—Taraxacum officinale


Written by webmaster. Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.


There are nine known species of echinacea, all of which are native to the United States and southern Canada. The most commonly used, Echinacea purpurea, is believed to be the most potent.

Common Names—echinacea, purple coneflower, coneflower, American coneflower

Latin Names—Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 Ephedra is an evergreen shrub-like plant native to Central Asia and Mongolia. The principal active ingredient, ephedrine, is a compound that can powerfully stimulate the nervous system and heart.

Common Names—ephedra, Chinese ephedra, ma huang

Latin Name—Ephedra sinica


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

European elder is a tree native to Europe and parts of Asia and Africa, and it also grows in the United States. There are several different types of elder, such as American elder, but European elder is the type most often used as a supplement.

Common Names—European elder, black elder, elder, elderberry, elder flower, sambucus

Latin Name—Sambucus nigra



Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Ginger is a tropical plant that has green-purple flowers and an aromatic underground stem (called a rhizome). It is commonly used for cooking and medicinal purposes.

Common Name—ginger

Latin NameZingiber officinale


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Goldenseal is a plant that grows wild in parts of the United States but has become endangered by overharvesting. With natural supplies dwindling, goldenseal is now grown commercially across the United States, especially in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Common Names—goldenseal, yellow root

Latin NameHydrastis canadensis

Ginkgo biloba

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

The ginkgo tree is one of the oldest types of trees in the world. Ginkgo seeds have been used intraditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years, and cooked seeds are occasionally eaten.

Common Names—ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba, fossil tree, maidenhair tree, Japanese silver apricot, baiguo, bai guo ye, kew tree, yinhsing (yin-hsing)

Latin Name—Ginkgo biloba

Green Tea

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 All types of tea (green, black, and oolong) are produced from the Camellia sinensis plant using different methods. Fresh leaves from the Camellia sinensis plant are steamed to produce green tea.

Common Names—green tea, Chinese tea, Japanese tea

Latin NameCamellia sinensis

Evening primrose oil

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 Evening primrose is a plant native to North America, but it grows in Europe and parts of the Southern hemisphere as well. It has yellow flowers that bloom in the evening. Evening primrose oil contains gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an essential fatty acid. Essential fatty acids are required by the body for growth and development, and must be obtained from the diet.

Common Names—evening primrose oil, EPO

Latin Name—Oenothera biennis

Sunscreen Facts You Need to Know

Written by Stephanie Tweito Jacob. Posted in Family Health.

You know sunscreen is a must whenever you’re outside, but sunburn has probably still caught you by surprise at some point. By slathering on sunscreen, you may have thought you were playing it safe, but there’s actually more to it than that.

“Sunscreen is a misconstrued skin care category,” says Ranella Hirsch, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Boston University School of Medicine. Not applying often enough or misunderstanding labels can add up to lousy protection and sun damage.  

Check out these commonly held sunscreen myths, then the facts that will keep your fun in the sun safe.

what the government is doing with regards to cat dewclaws

Written by Dr. Rose DiLeva VMD, MS, CVCP, CVA. Posted in Ask The Vet.

Q:    I have heard some varying information about what the government is doing with regards to cat dewclaws among other things. Can you elaborate on these topics, please? 

A:  From the latest information that I’ve read, the Santa Monica City Council in California voted to draft a new law that would restrict the process of declawing in cats. It appears that a similar ban is being sought out in San Francisco as well. The way the process goes, once an ordinance is drafted it goes to the city council where it has until December 31st, 2009 to take effect. Public hearings are allowed and required followed by yes or no votes by the second reading of the ordinance. There are numerous reasons why some people find it necessary to declaw their cats and personally I find the legislation appalling. It should be up to the owner of the cat and the veterinarian to determine the benefits or deterrents to such a procedure.

Toxic Foods for you Cat

Written by Dr.Rose DiLeva VMD,MS,CVCP,CVA. Posted in Ask The Vet.

Q:     I just purchased a new kitty and want to know what foods are toxic to cats?

A:    There are a number of human foods that can be toxic to cats and cause anything from intestinal obstruction to gastrointestinal upsets and neurologic sign such as seizures. Since cats are carnivores it is best to purchase a pet cat food that is balanced and nutritious. In my opinion you should look for one of the first two ingredients listed to be of meat origin, i.e. chicken, beef, venison, duck, rabbit. This will ensure that your cat gets the meat protein that it requires.

Weight Loss Programs Making the Right Choice

Written by Philip L. Rothbart, M.D., J.D.. Posted in Weight Loss & Dieting.

Do you want to lose weight? Have you tried to lose weight before, but nothing has worked?
Here is the inside scoop of weight loss programs and information that will help you on your journey to your goal weight.

Selecting the right weight loss program:

There are two general options that provide the framework for your weight loss program.

Zero Balancing: The Balancing of the Energy of Body Structure

Written by Joanne Lynam, CMT/ Reiki Master. Posted in Natural Health.

Alternative therapies are the new pioneers in changing the landscape of the health profession. The healing arts have been around for centuries but for most of us, we are just beginning to recognize its creditability.

 In the alternative realm, we use energy forces, affirmation, breath and manual techniques totreatourclients. Holistic and energetic cures have been applied with positive healing results(homeostasis). The best results occur when the healer takes the time to listen to the body and then apply techniques to assist the body in its own healingprocess. Zero Balancing (also called ZB)is a perfect example of one of these whole body,holistic modalities.

Camp Tips for Parents

Written by Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Posted in Family Health.

Q: When should I start researching for a summer camp for my child(ren) to attend? A: In the fall. Start by getting on camp mailing lists and research websites. Most camps start the application and enrollment process in the winter and spring. Make sure to complete applications and return them by their due dates.

Q: What resources are available to select a good, quality camp?

Is The Seesaw of Health Tilted?

Written by Dr. Scott Rosenthal. Posted in Family Health.

Part II
          In last month’s article, we took a recess to run around the playground of health. That’s because our health balances like a seesaw between greater wellness and happiness and illness and despair. The tip of the balance depends on the choices we make. Because no one can score on a playground unless he or she can see the goal, we make our best decisions when we have a clear picture of our health goal: “the perfect me.” Once that vision is ensconced in our minds, we are ready to make choices that will tip our balance toward optimum health and happiness.

Study Confirms - Height of Heel Matters in Prevention of Foot Pain

Written by American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society. Posted in Family Health.

New study details biomechanical changes in foot associated with high-heel height

For years orthopaedic surgeons specializing in foot and ankle care have been warning women about the perils of wearing high heels. High heel wearers risk foot injury, muscle imbalance, bone deformities, knee and ankle joint problems, bunions, hammer toes and more. Now a new study featured in the November issue of Foot & Ankle International (FAI), the official scientific journal of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) details the biomechanical changes that occur in feet during high heel wear and the correlation between the heel height and amount of pain, pressure and strain it puts on your feet.

Yoga Adds Life To Life!

Written by Dr. Scott Rosenthal. Posted in Yoga.

          Many of us walk like stressed out zombies- tensely dragging through a life that's like an over-filled martini glass spewing its mixture of stress hormones and toxins with our every move. Tight from worries about the past and fears of the future, our muscles desperately grip our bones. Adding to the aging process, each daily obligation engraves more wrinkles across our zombie foreheads. Are we too busy to truly live? Is there a way to break the trance of distraction that dominates our consciousness and ravages our emotional and physical health? If we are willing to change our zombie walk and bend our bodies a little, the answer is YES!

More Than A Cup Of Joe

Written by Brian Strauss. Posted in The Art Of Eating.

“Ah! How sweet coffee tastes!

Lovelier than a thousand kisses,

sweeter than Muscatel wine!

I must have my coffee...”

  - Johann Sebastian Bach  (1732, an aria from his ‘Kaffee-Kantate’) -

Recently, a very good friend of ours brought us a few pounds of coffee beans from Canada as a gift. He had been living down the street from this small coffee roaster and each morning on his way to work he was captured by the heavenly scent of fresh brewed coffee. He told us that this was the best coffee he had ever tried and with an air of anticipation, we made a pot. The coffee was extraordinary; it had a great flavor, well balanced and a great taste. He was right, it really was the best cup of coffee we had tried.


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

The yohimbe tree is a tall evergreen that is native to western Africa. The bark of the tree contains a chemical called yohimbine. The amount of yohimbine in dietary supplements may vary; some yohimbe products have been found to contain very little yohimbine. A drug form of yohimbine—yohimbine hydrochloride—has been studied for erectile dysfunction.

Common Names—yohimbe, yohimbe bark

Latin Name—Pausinystalia yohimbe

Taking Dietary Supplements Wisely

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 Many people take dietary supplements in an effort to be well and stay healthy. With so many dietary supplements available and so many claims made about their health benefits, how can a consumer decide what's safe and effective? This fact sheet provides a general overview of dietary supplements, discusses safety considerations, and suggests sources for additional information. Check Out Living Well Magazine's  list of supplements and fact sheets

Grape seed extract

Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 The grape seeds used to produce grape seed extract are generally obtained from wine manufacturers. The leaves and fruit of the grape have been used medicinally since ancient Greece.

Common Name—grape seed extract

Latin NameVitis vinifera


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 The first recorded use of fenugreek is described on an ancient Egyptian papyrus dated to 1500 B.C. Fenugreek seed is commonly used in cooking.

Common Names—fenugreek, fenugreek seed

Latin Name—Trigonella foenum-graecum


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Hawthorn is a spiny, flowering shrub or small tree of the rose family. The species of hawthorn discussed here are native to northern European regions and grow throughout the world.

Common Names—hawthorn, English hawthorn, harthorne, haw, hawthorne

Latin NamesCrataegus laevigata (also known as Crataegus oxyacantha),Crataegus monogyna


The Law of Attraction for Greater Health

Written by Dr Scott Rosenthal. Posted in Family Health.

 Who wants better health, greater wealth and more rewarding relationships? The real question is “who doesn’t?” Why do some seem to easily attain all they desire, while others are left with constant yearning? You can gain the answer to that question through better understanding of what is commonly known as the “Law of Attraction.” 

Pet Massage

Written by Karen Verna Carlson, N.D., Ph.D. (Hon.). Posted in Holistic Living.

Rubbing, scrubbing, scratching, brushing, petting, patting your dog, cat, hamster, horse, sheep, parakeet, cockatiel, chicken, iguana, snake or turtle is a feel good time for both of you. Beyond that, much has been researched and published about therapeutic benefits interacting with a "companion animal."

I've felt exhilarated swimming with a dolphin holding its dorsal fin at a Key Largo rescue center, observed the deLIGHTING of nursing home residents and staff when pets visited, and have seen physically challenged children transform astride a gentle horse.

Writer's Bio: Karen is a naturopathic physician who has taken holistic healing and education into the realm of quantum physics. She is credited with “the first major breakthrough in Swedish Massage ~ research demonstrating energetic interconnections ~ since Peter Ling systemized it in the early 19th century.” International recognition for her healing and educational work includes an honorary degree, a silver medal, listing in Who’s Who of Professional and Business Women, appearances on TV and radio, lecturing in Europe and in the U.S. for professional symposia, colleges, corporations, community groups, and being featured in professional journals, magazines and newspapers. She has published more than 200 articles on holistic health and education. She has facilitated joyful well-being and health for hundreds of students she has personally certified in holistic healing and holistic massage and for hundreds more clients she has personally touched including luminaries in science, medicine and religion.

Relieving Hay Fever with Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine

Written by Barry L. Gommer Jr. L.Ac.. Posted in Acupuncture.

What are Allergies?

Allergies are a very common problem. More than 50 million Americans suffer from various types of allergies. One out of every eleven visits to a doctor's office is somehow connected to allergy symptoms. Out of the 50 million Americans who suffer from allergies, 35 million of that population has allergic rhinitis, also known as Hay fever. Allergic rhinitis is the single most common chronic disease experienced by Americans today. One third of all people in the U.S. have at least one type of allergy.

Fifteen million Americans, seven percent of the population, suffer from asthma, and the most common cause of asthma is allergies. Asthma is also the number six cause for hospitalization in the U.S., and the number one cause for hospitalization among children. The U.S. economy spends an estimated $4.5 billion per year and as many as 5,000 Americans die from Asthma each year.

Allergies are caused from the immune system overreacting to certain antigens, called allergens, in the body's system. An allergen is the main trigger of an allergy. Typically, an allergen is the reaction of one's immune system to something that is harmless to other people. People who have allergies are often sensitive to more than one thing. Allergens that often cause reactions are pollen, dust mites, mold, pet dander, food, insect stings, and medicines.

Signs & Symptoms of Allergies

Most allergic reactions are mild. Symptoms include watery, itchy eyes, possible conjunctivitis or red eyes, runny and itchy nose with sneezing, nasal congestion, itching of the skin and roof of the mouth, and swelling and redness of the skin in blotches also known as hives.

People who suffer from hay fever often have other types of allergic conditions as well. This includes allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis or eczema. For instance, some people with hay fever will go on to develop asthmatic attacks if the hay fever is bad enough or lasts long enough. Asthma refers to difficulty breathing accompanied by wheezing and coughing. Some people also develop sinusitis or infection and inflammation of the sinus cavities secondary to a bout of hay fever. Other symptoms associated with hay fever include frontal headaches (due to sinus congestion), irritability, and loss of appetite, depression, and insomnia.

According to the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology new research found Traditional Chinese Medicine safely and effectively treats patients with persistent atopic dermatitis or eczema. This study could lead more physicians to prescribe Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) to treat this allergic condition.
The traditional Chinese medical term for allergic rhinitis is bi qiu, or sniveling nose. This refers to the runny nose characteristic of allergic rhinitis. Nasal congestion, itchy nose, and red and itchy eyes are a few of the main symptoms of allergic rhinitis that are also effectively treated with Traditional Chinese Medicine. In other words, although allergic rhinitis is a modern western medical disease, Chinese doctors have been treating people with the symptoms of allergic rhinitis for thousands of years.

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest healing practices in the world. TCM is widespread throughout Asia, Europe, and the United States. TCM is a comprehensive system of health care with a continuous history of over 3000 years and pre dates modern western medicine by several thousand years.

This ancient health care system is proving itself as an effective modality for a wide spectrum of medical conditions and diseases. TCM emphasizes a holistic approach to health for the whole person rather than only focusing on one particular symptom as if it were isolated from the rest of the mind and body. TCM is about prevention and strengthening the body's own self regulation system, therefore restoring the body's balance. Patients are diagnosed according to the unique symptoms of each individual, their disease pattern, and their individual constitution.

The practice of TCM may include acupuncture, herbology, Tuina Chinese massage, QiGong which is a breathing and stretching exercise to help increase oxygen and promote blood flow, and nutritional and lifestyle recommendations.

The benefits of acupuncture are recognized by the National Institute of Health (NIH), Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) and the World Health Organization (WHO) to be effective in the treatment for over forty common disorders such as rhinitis, allergies, sinusitis, colds and flu, asthma, nausea, constipation, prostatitis, menstrual irregularity, endometriosis, PMS, infertility, pain associated with back, neck, shoulder and wrist, TMJ, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia, IBS, depression, anxiety, insomnia, migraines, post stroke paralysis, stop smoking, and stress.

In addition, acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine have been used for centuries throughout Asia to treat hundreds of other problems.

How does Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese Medicine work?

Modern Western medicine cannot yet explain how acupuncture works. Traditional Asian acupuncture is based on ancient Chinese theories of the flow of qi (chee or chi), a fine, essential substance which nourishes and constructs the body. The flow of qi follows distinct pathways that cover the body somewhat like nerves and blood vessels. According to this theory, acupuncture adjusts the flow of qi in the body, leading it to areas where it is insufficient and draining it from areas where it is stuck and / or super abundant. In this way, acupuncture restores the harmonious balance of the body and its parts.

When performed by a competently trained, licensed professional, acupuncture is extremely safe. All licensed acupuncturists today use individually packaged, sterile, disposable needles. That way, there is virtually no chance of infection or contagion.

Acupuncture needles are typically not much thicker than a hair, and their insertion is practically painless. It is nothing like receiving an ordinary injection. In some cases, you will not even know the needles are in place. In others, there may be some tingling, warmth, heaviness, or a feeling of the qi moving up and down the channels. Most people find acupuncture extremely relaxing, and many fall asleep during treatment.

Chinese Herbal Medicine

Herbal medicine is the main modality or treatment method within TCM. Although acupuncture was the first Chinese modality to gain wide acceptance is the West, Chinese herbal medicine is quickly establishing itself as one of the most popular and effective alternative therapies in the West.

Does Chinese herbal medicine have side effects?

There can be side effects from anything. However, if the formula has been correctly chosen and properly applied by a trained TCM practitioner, according to a correct TCM pattern diagnosis, there should be no negative side effects, only beneficial healing results. If a patient experiences any discomfort while taking Chinese herbs, they should tell their practitioner, who will then modify their formula. Most of the medicinal in the Chinese material medica have a very low toxicity compared to common, over the counter Western drugs.

Traditional Chinese Medicine is not just for adults it is also safe for kids.

Caution: The improper use of Chinese Herbal Medicine can be dangerous. Please consult with a licensed acupuncturist before taking any herbal products.

TCM is extremely effective when applied properly and when used in conjunction with other medical and natural health sciences such as chiropractic care, exercise, and nutritional therapies.

What is a typical acupuncture treatment for Hay Fever like?

When treating Hay fever it depends on each individual and how bad their allergies are as well as how fast they respond to each treatment. A normal course may be anywhere between 6 to 24 treatments in the acute stage with treatments being two to three times a week. After the acute stage, treatments may be spread out depending on the individual's progress.

If you are one of the increasing numbers of those who suffer from allergies and are tired of over the counter medications which offer only temporary relief and possible side effects, then explore TCM and get longer lasting results.

Good Health!

Barry L. Gommer Jr. L.Ac. Is a licensed Acupuncturist and an Oriental Medicine Practioner specializing in Chinese Medical Therapies? He has been studying martial arts for the past twenty years with the majority of the training with Yees Hung Ga International Kung Fu Association where he currently holds a 3rd degree black belt, is an instructor with the association and governing board member. Barry brings his twenty years of martial arts training, his background in fitness and Traditional Chinese Medicine to help each person improve their overall mind and body health.

Barry L. Gommer Jr. L.Ac. Can be reached at First State Health and Wellness 302-454-1200 or by email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

What is Rolfing?

Written by Christopher Richardson. Posted in Hands on Health .

 Rolfing is a therapy that methodically rebalances your body. It frees your body from restrictions as it releases stresses, strains and tensions held in your physical structure. Rolfing improves and restores flexibility and range of motion, releasing bound-up energy. After Rolfing, your body expends less of its vital energies against gravity. This restored freedom leads to a sense of increased physical vitality with less effort, noticeably higher levels of energy, improved health and physical appearance.

Young Athletes Overuse Their Bodies and Strike Out Too Early

Written by Lisa Weisenberger. Posted in Excercise.

Healthcare, Business Leaders and Professional Athletes Join Forces to Help Young Athletes Play Safe and Stay Healthy

Today, leaders in healthcare, wellness, safety and fitness came together to launch the STOP Sports Injuries campaign. The campaign will educate athletes, parents, trainers, coaches and healthcare providers about the rapid increase in youth sports injuries, the necessary steps to help reverse the trend and the need to keep young athletes healthy.

STOP Sports Injuries campaign highlights include teaching proper prevention techniques, discussing the need for open communication between everyone involved in young athletes' lives, and encouraging those affected to take The Pledge to become advocates for sports safety and take the preventative measures to keep kids in the game for life.

Heat Illness Prevention

Written by Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Safe Kids Georgia. Posted in Family Health.

Some general guidelines to help protect your child from heat-related illnesses include the following:

-Drink plenty of fluids during vigorous or outdoor activities (including sunbathing), especially on hot days. Drinks of choice include water and sports drinks; avoid alcohol and fluids with caffeine such as tea, coffee and cola, as these can lead to dehydration.

Fish Oil- Japan's Secret to Longevity and Beauty Now Yours

Written by David Cassell. Posted in Family Health.

For a long time, scientist wondered why people who live in Japan were generally healthier and lived longer than their Western counterparts.

One idea that was put forward was that people in Japan and Asia are generally had more active lifestyles than people in the West. However, scientists believed there was more to it than that.

After years of research, scientists found out that Japanese love of fish was a major contributor to their supreme health and longevity.

Drink More Water

Written by Karen Verna Carlson, N.D., Ph.D. (Hon.). Posted in Holistic Living.

Drink More Water

Winter dehydration has greater consequences than just dry skin. It may also be the source of your seasonal blues and flues.   

“Drink at least one quart of pure water a day” was one of the first self-health assignments for students in my holistic practitioner classes.  Over 30 years and more than 12,000 reports from 600 students, along with my professional observations, and I can say quite confidently that drinking pure water has miraculous healing effect.

Writer's Bio: Karen is a naturopathic physician who has taken holistic healing and education into the realm of quantum physics. She is credited with “the first major breakthrough in Swedish Massage ~ research demonstrating energetic interconnections ~ since Peter Ling systemized it in the early 19th century.” International recognition for her healing and educational work includes an honorary degree, a silver medal, listing in Who’s Who of Professional and Business Women, appearances on TV and radio, lecturing in Europe and in the U.S. for professional symposia, colleges, corporations, community groups, and being featured in professional journals, magazines and newspapers. She has published more than 200 articles on holistic health and education. She has facilitated joyful well-being and health for hundreds of students she has personally certified in holistic healing and holistic massage and for hundreds more clients she has personally touched including luminaries in science, medicine and religion.

C-Section Prevention, More Comfortable Pregnancies and Easier Births With Chiropractic!

Written by Dr. Scott Rosenthal. Posted in Women's Health.

          Celeste was expecting. She felt great and welcomed each miraculous change. The baby moved easily into to the head-down position. She walked comfortably with a steady confidence throughout her last trimester. The delivery was easy and beautiful. Her midwife commented on the joy of assisting in such a wonderful delivery experience. Her recovery quickly unfolded.

Living Well: The Health Benefits of Coffee

Written by Brian Strauss. Posted in Family Health.

Coffee has been getting a bad rap for years. Check out some of these healthy benefits for the morning brew!

Blood pressure—
Results from long-term studies are showing that coffee may not increase the risk for high blood pressure over time, as previously thought. Study findings for other cardiovascular effects are a mixed bag. What we do know is that for non-habitual coffee drinkers, those first few cups will cause a temporary rise in blood pressure, but for regular drinkers, a tolerance develops and won’t cause any long term, permanent increase.


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Asian ginseng is native to China and Korea and has been used in various systems of medicine for many centuries. Asian ginseng is one of several types of true ginseng (another is American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius). An herb called Siberian ginseng or eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is not a true ginseng.

Common Names—Asian ginseng, ginseng, Chinese ginseng, Korean ginseng, Asiatic ginseng

Latin NamePanax ginseng

A Hot Beverage...Can Soothe the Soul

Written by Tamar L. Genger (RD). Posted in Healthy Eating.

hot coffee and green tea

 Many people dread winter because of the freezing weather, multiple layers of clothes, and icy driving conditions. But I grew up in Florida and was jealous of my friends who got snow days and were able to make snowmen outside and sit by a fire when they came home. Now that I have been living up north for about ten years, I still look forward to winter to enjoy staying indoors and snuggling with my family with a hot drink warming me from inside out. A hot drink is one of the best parts of winter and whether you choose coffee, tea, or even cocoa, they are not only delicious but they can also be nutritious.


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

Flaxseed is the seed of the flax plant, which is believed to have originated in Egypt. It grows throughout Canada and the northwestern United States. Flaxseed oil comes from flaxseeds.

Common Names—flaxseed, linseed

Latin Names—Linum usitatissimum


Posted in Vitamins,Supplements & Herbs.

 Originally a plant native to the Balkan mountains of Eastern Europe, feverfew—a short bush with daisy-like flowers—now grows throughout Europe, North America, and South America.

Common Names—feverfew, bachelor's buttons, featherfew

Latin Names—Tanacetum parthenium, Chrysanthemum parthenium

Teen Pregnancy Is a Public Health Issue, Not a Political One!

Written by Dr. Michelle Golland. Posted in Family Health.

 “The story about first graders possibly getting condoms in Massachusetts showed, yet again, how the issue of sex education in our country has become politicized in such a ridiculous way that we lose sight of the importance of informing our children about their sexuality and reproductive health. This issue should not be placed in the Liberal vs. Conservative category. Rather, it squarely falls within “public health.”  - Dr. Michelle Golland

 Teen pregnancy is a public health issue that should cause us all a great deal of concern. 

The problem is that when we look at it with a religious or political view, too many people arm themselves with "family values" and claim that they don't want our public schools to address these "value" decisions. Unfortunately, birth control and teen pregnancy aren't "value" issues. They're very critical issues of child development. 

Blueberries Over-Hyped as Health Food?

Written by Rebecca Durand. Posted in Healthy Eating.

In the past year or two, tons of media attention of all kinds has been paid to the blueberry because of its health giving properties.
Dr. Dave Woynarowski, a Southeastern Pennsylvania Anti-Aging doctor, says we've got it all wrong. He believes in longer and healthier living through better diet and supplementation. Dr. Dave says, "The new berry on the block is likely to be black or purple, not blue."

Weight Loss Programs Making the Right Choice part 2

Written by Philip L. Rothbart, M.D., J.D.. Posted in Weight Loss & Dieting.

Transition Phase:

The transitional phase will provide you with a gradual move away from the meal-replacement nutrition which makes up the most of your program in the active weight loss phase, and toward more “ordinary” foods.  Your diet should be rich in fruits and vegetables, along with lean meats, fowl, and fish.  During this phase one should continue to use and enjoy the shakes, bars, smoothies, puddings, and soups that have represented the bulk of your intake during the active weight loss phase, but now they will constitute more as a small snack rather than a meal.

No bones about it

Posted in Pet Health.

The idea that it’s natural for dogs to chew on bones is a popular one. However, it’s a dangerous practice and can cause serious injury to your pet.

“Some people think it’s safe to give dogs large bones, like those from a ham or a roast,” says Carmela Stamper, D.V.M., a veterinarian in the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the Food and Drug Administration. “Bones are unsafe no matter what their size. Giving your dog a bone may make your pet a candidate for a trip to your veterinarian’s office later, possible emergency surgery, or even death.”

“Make sure you throw out bones from your own meals in a way that your dog can’t get to them,” adds Stamper, who suggests taking the trash out right away or putting the bones up high and out of your dog’s reach until you have a chance to dispose of them. “And pay attention to where your dog’s nose is when you walk him around the neighborhood—steer him away from any objects lying in the grass.”

Here are 10 reasons why it’s a bad idea to give your dog a bone:

1. Broken teeth. This may call for expensive veterinary dentistry.
2. Mouth or tongue injuries. These can be very bloody and messy and may require a trip to see your veterinarian.
3. Bone gets looped around your dog’s lower jaw. This can be frightening or painful for your dog and potentially costly to you, as it usually means a trip to see your veterinarian.
4. Bone gets stuck in esophagus, the tube that food travels through to reach the stomach. Your dog may gag, trying to bring the bone back up, and will need to see your veterinarian.
5. Bone gets stuck in windpipe. This may happen if your dog accidentally inhales a small enough piece of bone. This is an emergency because your dog will have trouble breathing. Get your pet to your veterinarian immediately!
6. Bone gets stuck in stomach. It went down just fine, but the bone may be too big to pass out of the stomach and into the intestines. Depending on the bone’s size, your dog may need surgery or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, a procedure in which your veterinarian uses a long tube with a built-in camera and grabbing tools to try to remove the stuck bone from the stomach.
7. Bone gets stuck in intestines and causes a blockage. It may be time for surgery.
8. Constipation due to bone fragments. Your dog may have a hard time passing the bone fragments because they’re very sharp and they scrape the inside of the large intestine or rectum as they move along. This causes severe pain and may require a visit to your veterinarian.
9. Severe bleeding from the rectum. This is very messy and can be dangerous. It’s time for a trip to see your veterinarian.
10. Peritonitis. This nasty, difficult-to-treat bacterial infection of the abdomen is caused when bone fragments poke holes in your dog’s stomach or intestines. Your dog needs an emergency visit to your veterinarian because peritonitis can kill your dog.

“Talk with your veterinarian about alternatives to giving bones to your dog,” says Stamper. “There are many bone-like products made with materials that are safe for dogs to chew on.”

“Always supervise your dog with any chew product, especially one your dog hasn’t had before,” adds Stamper. “And always, if your dog ‘just isn’t acting right,’ call your veterinarian right away!”

This article appears on FDA's Consumer Updates page4, which features the latest on all FDA-regulated products.


Hazardous to Your Pet's Health

Written by Sherry Woodard. Posted in Pet Health.

Your pets rely on you to protect them from harm. In general, you should only feed your pets food and treats specially formulated for the type of pet that you have. Some human food and drink can make animals sick, so keep them out of your pets’ reach. Here are some examples:

Summer: The Season for Fireflies, Flashlights and Fractures

Written by Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Posted in Family Health.

Tips for Diagnosing Common Summer Injuries from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

It’s not a coincidence that the season for extended daylight and outdoor activity is also the season for broken bones. Increased physical activity leads to increased likelihood of bone fractures.

Summer vacation means many children are heading outdoors to participate in their favorite sport. The football field, baseball diamond and soccer pitch all see extensive action during this time of year.

The Hard Truth About Soft Drinks!

Written by Dr Scott Rosenthal. Posted in Healthy Eating.

You are on a first date in Japan. The pressure is CRUSHING! This make-it-or-break-it event can be DEADLY…

especially, if impressing your date requires gulping down a slice of Fugu or Blowfish at the hip new Sushi bar. Known as “Fuku” in western Japan, the Blowfish contains poisons that may cause INSTANT DEATH if not properly prepared by a certified chef!

If hospital bills could be compared, one common “beverage” found in the American diet poses a greater risk than all of the $50 plates of Fugu served in Asia. Unlike the paralyzing death that occurs within 24 hours from ill-prepared Blowfish consumption, American’s favorite “refreshment” kills slowly with little warning. To introduce the health-ravaging offender, we need NOT look in our oceans, rivers or lakes, but in any American refrigerator.

What Foods to Eat When Pregnant - Get the Facts

Written by Roger Noonan. Posted in Women's Health.

Foods to eat when pregnant is a very broad topic. Let us look at how the right choice of pregnancy nutrition can give you and your unborn baby the best possible journey towards that special day when he or she draws their very first breath.

How many times have you heard a woman say that she is "eating for two now?"This is not quite true, but she must eat the correct food to make sure that she has adequate levels of nutrition for the two of them. After all, the baby can only get what the mother's body is able to provide through the umbilical chord, its lifeline.

The Bermuda Triangle of Headaches

Written by Dr. Scott Rosenthal. Posted in Family Health.

          Christopher Columbus was the first person to note bizarre phenomena in the Bermuda Triangle, reporting that he observed "strange dancing lights on the horizon."  The region, also know as the Devil’s Triangle, may be famous for unusual happenings and strange disappearances, but a triangle yielding more wreckage can be found in the human neck and skull. 

The Basics Of Great Coffee

Written by Brian Strauss. Posted in The Art Of Eating.

Coffee Beans
Coffee beans are actually the seeds inside coffee cherries. The cherries grow on trees that are usually cut to about eight feet to allow for easier picking. However, in many forests the trees grow wild and much taller.
Each coffee cherry normally holds two beans. Some freak cherries only hold one bean. These are called peaberries and tend to have more intense flavor.

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