Are Your Vitamins And Supplements Safe?

Written by Melissa Crispell.

vitamin and supplement can help you Live Well!Consumer Reports recently stated, “In 2015 Americans spent over $35 Billion on dietary supplements.” But did you know that supplement manufacturers aren’t required to prove to the Food and Drug Administration that their products are effective, or even safe, before putting them on the market? As a clinical nutritionist, it is my mission to empower people to make educated choices that will enhance, not compromise, their health. If you are using, or considering using, vitamins and supplements, it will be helpful to consider these important guidelines:

Tumeric

Turmeric, a shrub related to ginger, is grown throughout India, other parts of Asia, and Africa. Known for its warm, bitter taste and golden color, turmeric is commonly used in fabric dyes and foods such as curry powders, mustards, and cheeses. It should not be confused with Javanese turmeric.

Cranberry
Cranberries

 Cranberries are the fruit of a native plant of North America. These red berries are used in foods and in herbal products.

Common Names—cranberry, American cranberry, bog cranberry

Latin Name—Vaccinium macrocarpon

What Cranberry Is Used For
Historically, cranberry fruits and leaves were used for a variety of problems

Echinacea is it effective?

Written by Lwm Staff.

Echinacea

 Echinacea, also known as purple coneflower, has gained popularity in recent years as a nutritional supplement that proponents believe is helpful in staving off the common cold and shortening its duration. But given the variation between dosages and formulations—such herbs are not regulated as medical drugs by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and so makers have little incentive to standardize—it’s hard to get definitive answers as to Echinacea’s effectiveness.

Chasteberry
Chasteberry

 Chasteberry is the fruit of the chaste tree, a small shrub-like tree native to Central Asia and the Mediterranean region. The name is thought to come from a belief that the plant promoted chastity—it is reported that monks in the Middle Ages used chasteberry to decrease sexual desire.

Common Names—chasteberry, chaste-tree berry, vitex, monk's pepper

Latin Name—Vitex agnus-castus

 

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